Short and long sight

Short sightedness (myopia) – also known as near-sightedness

If light that comes into your eyes is focused in front of the retina so your distance vision is blurred, you are short-sighted. Short-sighted people’s near vision is usually clear.

Short sight normally develops in childhood or adolescence and is often first noticed at school. You may need to wear glasses all the time,or just for driving, watching TV or sports.

1. Normally, light is focussed by the cornea and lens to form a sharp image on the retina.
2. Sometimes the eyeball is too long for the shape of the cornea
3. so the light comes to a focus before it reaches the retina.
4. As a result, objects in the distance are blurred
5. although close objects are usually clear.
6. Short-sightedness can be corrected by glasses or contact lenses.
7. These lenses correct the vision so that distant objects are clear once again.
Long-sightedness (hypermetropia)

If you are long-sighted, light that comes into your eyes is focused behind the retina rather than on it, and your eyes have to work hard to re-focus.

This can give you discomfort, headaches or problems with near vision. You may need to wear glasses all the time or just for close work, such as reading, writing or computer use. In older people, as re-focusing becomes more difficult, distance vision may also become blurred.

1.Normally, light is focussed by the cornea and lens to form a sharp image on the retina.
2.Long-sightedness occurs when the eyeball is slightly too short
3.so that objects are in focus behind the retina at the back of the eye.
4.This may result in blurred vision when looking in the distance
5. and particularly when looking at near objects and reading.
6. When we are young, we overcome long-sightedness by bulging out the lens in the eye.
7. However, as we get older, the lens gets harder and can no longer bulge out enough.
8. Long-sightedness can be corrected by glasses or contact lenses.